Getting Outside the Fashion Bubble: 5 Ways to Keep Perspective

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The world of fashion blogging can seem very insular. Like any other subculture, we have our own jargon, our own celebrities, and our own scandals.  Issues that take up a lot of time and energy in the fashion blogosphere can seem enormous…until we talk to someone who isn't a fashion blogger and realize it's still a pretty small world after all. While it was fairly easy for me to maintain perspective when I had an outside full-time job, I know from personal experience that the more you blog (and the more space blogging takes up in your life), the harder it is to avoid getting caught up in the hype. When I feel like I'm starting to lose my center, here are the five tips I keep in mind:

Have friends that aren't fashion bloggers.

Even better, have friends who don't care the slightest bit about fashion. Most of my friends aren't bloggers, and none of my friends are interested in the world of fashion. Don't get me wrong…all of my friends are super supportive. But whenever I mention fashion drama, their eyes just kind of glaze over and they zone out. Blogging, like any other hobby or job, takes up a lot of time when it's done well. The more immersed you become in blogging, the more important it is to have friends that are completely outside of that world. Nothing reminds you that there's more to life than Vogue than mentioning Karlie Kloss and having everyone else go “Who?”

Do and read things unrelated to fashion.

When my blog was still “just” a hobby, I read every book I could on the subject of fashion, and I read them as often as I could. However, when blogging took up more of my life, I began feeling a little burnt out both reading about fashion and writing about fashion all the time. Nowadays, I read books on history and food and fairies for fun. Having interests outside of the world of fashion is important to not only give your brain a break, but also because it helps you to come up with new ideas.

Remember that it's just fashion.

Please know that I'm not trying to trivialize our industry; I love fashion, both in and of itself, and also as a lens for talking about broader cultural issues. However, we're talking about style blogging here, not curing cancer. Take pride in what you do, but avoid taking yourself too seriously.

Avoid drama.

It's easy to avoid trolls and jerks; they announce their intentions from a mile away. Drama's a bit harder to sidestep though, especially when it sneaks up on you…usually with the best of intentions. Become an expert drama spotter. When you see a situation starting that's threatening to take up a disproportionate about of your time and resources – avoid it!

Focus on what you love about fashion blogging and why you started doing it.

I don't know about you, but I didn't start fashion blogging because there was a shortage of drama in my life; I started blogging because I genuinely cared about my topic and felt like I had something to say that no one else was saying. If you didn't start blogging because you wanted to feel like you were part of a clique or because you wanted fashion week invites or because you wanted to meet famous people, don't let those things distract you from the reasons why you decided to become a blogger after the fact. Doing a quick “gut check” to make sure you're in tune with the reasons why you started blogging is a great way to keep perspective.

So…how do you maintain perspective while fashion blogging? Any tips for your fellow IFB-ers?

 

[Image credit: Shutterstock.com]

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6 Responses

  1. Lauren // thepearshape

    I LOVE this article. As blogging takes up more of my time and creeps its way into my professional life as well, I find that it is important to keep perspective. I do this by focusing on my blog only during certain times of day, and also watching not to only discuss my blog with friends/bf when we are chatting (can be an issue of mine. I just love it!). Also, I find that making the conscious decision not to social media certain events helps to maintain boundaries

    Reply
  2. Ashley "Ashe" Robison

    These are so, so good. And, at the risk of upsetting niche bloggers… if you feel the need to, share something OTHER than fashion on your blog. There’s a reason (I find) that fashion, beauty, lifestyle, and health often overlap in many ways. At the core, they’re all about the same thing– an appreciation for the things that make our lives beautiful and stimulate that part of our brains.

    Cora, I think you’re great at this– you have these incredible social, political, and body image posts that are centered around lingerie, but aren’t necessarily ABOUT lingerie.

    Find a fresh and exciting way to merge those things you love. (Like my other blog, Style in Cinema. It gives me a fresh, analytical perspective on how to look at costume design in film & television + how to recreate it.)

    While I love my real life friends for loving blogging & fashion, there’s something so reassuring about marrying a man who won’t shut up about gaming. It’s a nice step away.

    Reply
  3. Katie

    This resonates with me as a “hobby” blogger. Like you said, you found yourself completely immesersed in fashion as a hobby blogger and then felt burnt out. As I’m beginning my third year of college studying fashion, I’m starting to feel that same way and it terrifies me. I don’t want to end up like sports players who absolutely cannot stand the sport they spent so much time and effort on because they spent TOO much time and effort on it. Fantastic article, and I’m always looking forward to seeing what else IFB puts out for us. Thanks 🙂

    xx
    http://www.thestyleduckling.blogspot.com

    Reply
  4. War Julian

    The BEST line in this post for me is this:

    “…we’re talking about style blogging here, not curing cancer. Take pride in what you do, but avoid taking yourself too seriously.”

    A.MEN!

    Reply
  5. Paula

    I just have to mention blog or followers to my BF and he gives me a glazed look – that’s my perspective.

    Reply